Monday, November 22, 2010

Outrun

The temperatures hit 60 degrees on Sunday, and I had every intention of going for a run to enjoy the unseasonable weather. But something, something about best laid plans quoted from a John Steinbeck book, and I missed my opportunity to run as the day got away from me.

And that's how the Enthusiast outran me last week, after she up and decided to register for the Cleveland Half Marathon next May. Kudos to her.

I have told her now is the time get into a running rhythm before winter hits and enjoy the freedom of the miles before adopting a training plan for the race. You know: do as I say, not as I do.

And my right foot hurts kinda. And no, it's not from running in silly toe shoes. Because I haven't running much at all to merit a running injury. I think I tweaked it getting out of bed one morning last week.

That should teach me not to get out of bed anymore. But alas, attendance is required if I want to keep my occupation.

I was all excited when I saw that today too is supposed to be unseasonably warm. However, a second ago a roar of thunder drew my attention to the window where I saw it pouring rain. A thunderstorm in November? I'd prefer snow.

Fuck, did I just write that out loud?

3 comments:

Jamoosh said...

I have learned not to berate Mother Nature. Needless to say, you are screwed this winter.

Sun Runner said...

I stepped out of my house this morning and I believe my first words were "What the fuck?" It should not be 60 degrees in November in Michigan.

Heh heh...your fiancée and I will be going head to head in the Cleveland half next May. :)

I ruined my hamstring and my intention to run the Grand Rapids Marathon in an ill-conceived sprint to the finish of a Beer Mile. The most annoying injuries are the ones that have almost nothing to do with actual running.

Finally: it's northeast Ohio. Wait an hour and the weather will change.

Nitmos said...

Screw you guys. I'm lovin' the 60 degree day and wish it would multiply for a week or so. I went 8 miles today and enjoyed every step (and every drop of rain).